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Starting an asparagus patch

Asparagus    Greenwood, MO

I purchased "4yr. old" asparagus roots, planted 15 of them this spring and only 4 have produced the fern like growth. Does this mean that the others are done? Dead? Is it possible to move the living ones, since the others are not producing, if so when can I transplant them?


Posted by: Debbie Satterfield (1 point) Debbie Satterfield
Posted: July 29, 2013




Answers

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This year has been my first attempt at growing asparagus. I purchased 72 two year old crowns (that were on clearance), and planted them in mid June. I know......way too late for planting asparagus. Right now I have 32 tiny little ferns, and hopefully will still get a few more, as a few stragglers are still popping up. I'd say if you only have 4 after a spring planting, it's likely that no more will come up.

As far as moving the live ones, I think you could do that after they're completely dormant, BUT you'll likely set them back another year before you can start harvesting if you move them.


Posted by: Dean Hudson (7 points) Dean Hudson
Posted: July 29, 2013




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don't move the four you have till spring before they send up shoots. but it would be better not to move them at all. I have planted asparagus until july 1st Dean and it does fine . it just needs enough time to build up food reserves to survive the winter and I also put straw mulch over new plantings to help them get through the winter which is also a good idea to do as it will help young planting s survive. If you can Debbie just buy more plants in the spring and fill in where the plants died. Mulch your asparagus beds to keep weeds down.


Posted by: christopher hedding (3 points) christopher hedding
Posted: July 29, 2013




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Asparagus are heavy feeders that prefer neutral soil (6.5-7.5). If you don't feed them well, or if your soil pH is much lower or higher than neutral, it can seriously affect their growth. Mulch heavily and keep the weed competition down. Lay down a good layer (like 3") of composted manure soon after the fronds show up, and again in midsummer (or when the harvest is over).

If you live in a high-rainfall area like I do (W. WA), the rain will wash out a lot of nutrients (esp nitrogen) that needs to be replaced.

If you haven't had a soil test done, I would strongly advise you to get one, including the micro-nutrients, about $25. If you grow organically, write that on your soil test. Got an Agricultural college nearby? Call them. Soil tests aren't very scary: results on one side, with suggestions for improvement; definitions on the back side; a phone number for questions. You've seen movies that were worse and lived through them.


Posted by: FussyOldHen (16 points) FussyOldHen
Posted: August 8, 2013




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