1
point
How do I prune tomato plants?

Tomato   

My plants have gotten a bit out of control and I have no idea what to do with them. I've been pruning here and there but I have no idea what I am doing being honest. Can anyone provide some guidance to help me do it correctly?


Posted by: D. Thompson (2 points) D. Thompson
Posted: July 12, 2013




Answers

3
points
I never prune. It's dry here in the summer and breezy in the afternoons.

People who live in humid climates prune their plants to let air flow more freely through the plants to discourage fungal diseases (or at least keep them from spreading as quickly).


Posted by: Tanya in the Garden (128 points) Tanya in the Garden
Posted: July 13, 2013




1
point
You first need to find out whether you have determinate (shorter-vine "bush") tomatoes, or indeterminate (vines keep growing longer all season long) varieties. The determinate varieties, which will get quite bushy, do well in a inside a sturdy cage for support. In a humid climate, determinate varieties suffer less disease and are easier to maintain and harvest if you train them up a trellis and prune them.
Here's a good video that shows you how: http://bit.ly/12Mathq (Except they should have spelled it "leaf axil," not "axle." :-) I actually prune mine every couple of days.


Posted by: Peg Boyles (3 points) Peg Boyles
Posted: July 13, 2013




0
points
Let them go out of contro; they r indeterminates. If in yr way prune as u want.


Posted by: Carson E. Bench (1 point) Carson E. Bench
Posted: July 13, 2013




0
points
Take out side soots and when tall enough pinch out the top to stop them getting any taller when they start to ripen take the leaves bellow the first truss of to let the sun into them if they ripen quick the skins don't go tough


Posted by: cathy barker (3 points) cathy barker
Posted: July 13, 2013




0
points
I'm not sure what part of the world you're in, but I'm in eastern Ontario and I usually try to prune lower branches (I call the suckers) of my tomatoes early in the season--basically any branch that's not showing flowers, and even some of the low ones that are. For me, this has had the effect of concentrating growth into the fruit-bearing branches and also pushing the plants to grow upwards where they can get more sun. It's helped improve fruit yields, in my experience.

Although I've not noted anything reliable on this front, Tanya's point about air circulation is probably another argument in favour of pruning lower stalks.


Posted by: Peter Raaymakers (2 points) Peter Raaymakers
Posted: July 30, 2013




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