0
points
Tomato splits/grooves

Tomato    South of Houston. Halfway to Galveston.

Does anyone know what is causing these wierd grooves in my tomatoes? It's not on all of them, but it is a majority. Maybe 70%. I have some plants in planters and others in the ground. Seems to be the same regardless of which planting type it is.

When I cut off the end with the grooves (gouges?) the rest of the tomato looks and tastes fine. Sometimes it starts while the tomato is still green, sometimes not until it starts to change color. I'm in Texas near the Gulf Coast (Galveston area) where we've had huge rainfall for a few weeks and then it gets hot (I.e. 90+ degrees with heat index around 102).


Posted by: Geoff (2 points) Geoff
Posted: June 21, 2016


luca fadda commented,
hello , this symptom can be given as already said by a lack of calcium in the fruit and even from water stress . Try to provide to the foliar calcium crop planting the element by foliar fertilization . This will reduce the problem because provide this element and protect the plant from evapotranspiration . It also avoids any kind of plant pruning in the hours more hot and immediatamentw after administering of irrigation. cordial greetings
over 3 years ago.



Answers

1
point
This symptom can be caused by a lack of calcium in the fruit and even from water stress. Try to provide to the foliar calcium crop planting the element by foliar fertilization. This will reduce the problem because it provides this element and protects the plant from evapotranspiration. It also avoids any kind of plant pruning in the hotter hours, and immediately after administering of irrigation.


Posted by: luca fadda (2 points) luca fadda
Posted: June 21, 2016




1
point
Split skins and scarring are caused by irregular water amounts, especially too much water. Know how much water the plants are getting every day. An increase in daytime temperature can cause tomatoes to grow faster, resulting in higher water needs. Sporadic heavy rains may cause split skins in spite of your best efforts. Assuming no rain, the top one to two inches of soil should be dry 24 hours after watering. Some tomato varieties are more prone to skin splits than others. Be sure to water daily at the same time with the same amount of water. Gradually increase or decrease the water amount depending on temperature and plant behavior.
The photo, by the way, shows the stem end, so this cannot be blossom end rot.


Posted by: Dennis (7 points) Dennis
Posted: June 22, 2016




0
points
Hi
This is blossom end rot which happens because your growing tomatoes did not have enough calcium

Check out our tomato page https://www.plantvillage.org/en/topic...
and this
https://www.plantvillage.org/en/quest...



Posted by: David Hughes (43 points) David Hughes
Posted: June 21, 2016


Mauro Vardasca commented,
I agree, its calcium..
over 3 years ago.



0
points
Yes it's definitively calcium deficiency coupled with wet/ hot weather which caused the cracking of tomato skin, because calcium role in Plant physiology is related to cell enlargement. It will work if you put some lime in the soil mixture where you grow your tomatoes and let the nature do her job.


Posted by: Lucia Anna Carbone (2 points) Lucia Anna Carbone
Posted: July 29, 2016




0
points
I think it's caused by a complex of situations:
Hydric stress by long periods between waterings (very much days with too much humidity and to much days with little humidity) combined, maybe, with a calcium deficiency.


Posted by: Juan Tizcareño Iracheta (4 points) Juan Tizcareño Iracheta
Posted: February 5, 2017




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