0
points
whats wrong with my blackberries?

Blackberry   

Would anybody be able to tell me what is causing this to happen to my blackberries? Many of the berries have this pink colour but some are perfect. The berries taste quite tart but the plants are just fine as far as I can see. How can I stop this happening? Thanks


Posted by: Steve (1 point) Steve
Posted: July 22, 2013




Answers

2
points
This looks like White Drupelet Syndrome or White Drupelet Disorder. It has been attributed to stink bug damage during bloom, sun scald, or an unknown physiological disorder. Sunscald seems to get blamed the most, with damage occurring on the exposed side of the fruit. 'Apache' and 'Kiowa' are two varieties that are prone to the problem.

Below are two links that describes the disorder: http://www.ncsu.edu/project/berries/d...
http://www.ppdl.purdue.edu/ppdl/weekl...



Posted by: Charlie B. (84 points) Charlie B.
Posted: July 22, 2013




1
point
I have the Himalaya variety growing wild in my backyard along the Calif coast. I'm not an expert, but I've come to understand that these are either Redberry mites or Dryberry mites. I try to pick and dispose of the bad fruit, as the mites supposedly go dormant over the winter then reappear the following year.


Posted by: Julie (2 points) Julie
Posted: July 22, 2013




1
point
I live in Japan, and my blackberries looked just like that for the first time this year. I go with the mite answer, I noticed very tiny bugs flying all over the berries. They did not damage my raspberries that are right next to them. Too late to save the crop this year, but next year I will attack early with my new weapon of choice vinegar.


Posted by: Martha Nojima (2 points) Martha Nojima
Posted: July 23, 2013


Tanya in the Garden commented,
Flying bugs can be fruit flies.
over 6 years ago.



1
point
I am a commercial blackberry grower in California and I see this a lot in Arkansas varieties. The picture shows it is definitely sunburn. This is not a mite problem. You can correct this problem next season by using a sunshade that blocks a percentage of sunlight. We use a 30% sunshade cloth. Place sunshade cloth when temperatures reach above 85 deg. Needs to be on only when fruit is on.


Posted by: Samuel Lathrop (2 points) Samuel Lathrop
Posted: April 9, 2014




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