0
points
Why did my seeds not grow?

General   

Ok so I have been trying to to do the whole grow your own thing but I just can’t get anything to sprout. I gave up last year after spending too much money on seeds and supplies only to have nothing happen. I don’t know if there is any point trying again this year. All my seeds were in trays in the window and got loads of light and I never missed watering. Why didn’t anything grow? I tried to grow the seeds in flats that I bought at Lowes with a germination mix (think it was Miracle Grow) and i ad them sitting in a sunny window. The room was probably mid 60s and I watered them every day. NOTHING came up. What do you think might have been the problem. Oh i was trying to grow some different varieties of pepper, there was some beans, basil and also eggplant. There was something else too but i cant remember, I think I still have the packets somewhere



Posted by: Susan Davis (1 point) Susan Davis
Posted: February 21, 2013


deactivated commented,
Can you edit the question and give us a bit more info on what you've tried? Thanks!
almost 7 years ago.

Susan Davis commented,
sorry Marcel I have added a bit more information to the question - hope it helps :)
almost 7 years ago.

deactivated commented,
Definitely - the more precise the question, the better the answer, also for future viewers of this question.
almost 7 years ago.

Peg Boyles commented,
Susan, might have overwatered to the point where your seeds rotted.
over 6 years ago.

Susan Davis commented,
really!? oooops! I did not think I could give them too much water while they were seeds. Is every day too much?
over 6 years ago.



Answers

3
points
Too much moisture and having the seed starter too soggy can hinder seed development also. I would wet the soil, mix well to get even (but not soggy) moisture before spreading in the cell-packs. Then once the seeds are planted being extra careful to follow the seed pack's suggestions on depth, then mist with a sprayer on the top to get the seed wet. Make sure the cover is tight so humidity develops on the inside of the cover (think hot, greenhouse). Check everyday for sprouts. As soon as sprouted, get the lid off. Some seeds are very finicky. I found old seeds to struggle to start, and certain varieties are difficult like spinach and peppers. Some seeds just take a long time but the seed pack will tell you that. Celery for example, takes about two weeks to sprout.


Posted by: Jill (7 points) Jill
Posted: February 22, 2013




2
points
Tough luck striking out before you even saw a sprout, Susan! Giving a little more information would help. For example: What types of seeds did you plant? What sort of planting medium did you use? Did you buy a commercial "soilless" potting mix or some bagged topsoil, or did you dig up some dirt from the yard? Did you add fertilizers or anything else to the soil mix? What sort of trays did you use as your planting containers? What about the temperature in the room? How often did you water?

Any of these factors alone or in combination might have prevented your seeds from sprouting. [And by the way, I can sympathize. I've been gardening for more than 40 years, and for some reason, I'm having trouble getting good germination from my onion seeds this year.]



Posted by: Peg Boyles (3 points) Peg Boyles
Posted: February 21, 2013




2
points
You can try the paper towel method for some seeds. I successfully sprouted a half dozen varieties of peppers without a heating mat one year by placing the seeds on moist (wrung out, not soggy) paper towels inside a ziplock (sealed) plastic bag. I placed them in front of a sunny window, where they got warm but not overheated. Peppers are slow, so it took a few days for them to sprout. I was potting them up within a couple weeks.

With this method (any method, actually), you have to check them every day. The tiny rootlets can start growing into the paper towel, so it's important to pot them up as soon as the root emerges from the seed. Water the potting mix, but don't let it get soggy.

In general, seeds like high humidity and warmth until they sprout, and then they need some nutrients, good light, good air circulation, and a little less watering.


Posted by: Tanya in the Garden (128 points) Tanya in the Garden
Posted: April 4, 2013




1
point
The age of the seeds and the depth of planting might also be factors.


Posted by: David Goodman (67 points) David Goodman
Posted: February 21, 2013




0
points
seems odd that you got nothing, but the peppers, and eggplant do better at about 76 degrees. i would try purchasing a heat mat to set my tray on. many seedlings do better with bottom heat. like us they are much happier with warm feet.


Posted by: john faust (5 points) john faust
Posted: April 8, 2013




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