1
point
What type of soil best suits Oregon Giant Sugar Peas

Pea    Zeeland, MI

Many years ago, we planted a huge patch of these peas and had TONS. Then for several years we didn't plant any. I've recently started planting them (in the same garden area) and for the past couple of years had fairly indifferent results - plants seemed spindly, not a lot of peas. This year, I planted a row (using new seed just purchased) and only ONE pea germinated. Ideas and info appreciated!


Posted by: Conni Schaftenaar (2 points) Conni Schaftenaar
Posted: June 20, 2013




Answers

3
points
I have also had consistent issues with snap pea germination, so I have started germinating them indoors in a wet paper towel tucked inside an (unsealed) ziplock bag. This seems to give them a leg up. I get around 90% germination, then I plant the successfully germinated seeds. It helps even more if you can first transplant them into small pots (like the 6 cell plastic packs that you would get with plants from the nursery). If you re-use cell packs, make sure they are washed first - I use a 10% bleach solution to soak for 10-20 minutes, then rinse well). I put the planted sprouted seeds in the cell packs in a bright sunny area out front of the house during the day, then take them in at night. After they are 2-3 inches high I transplant to the garden plot with a little fertilizer or compost worked into the soil. I have had the best luck transplanting in early April (in Pennsylvania) and covering with a light row cover. They are fairly frost resistant, so the row cover is not absolutely necessary, but they grow quite well under it and are protected from critters and strong winds. At this time, I just put some small sticks under the row cover for them to begin climbing on. When they are about 8 inches high I take off the row cover and erect a trellis along the seedling row for them to move onto after they outgrow the small sticks.

Growing peas in the heat of the summer doesn't usually work well, and to plant in the fall, you have to time it right. See how long the seed packet says it takes for them to produce fruits. In the past, I have tried planting in late August, but by the time they started setting flowers, frost was starting to occur. While the plants are resistant to frost, the flowers and fruits are very sensitive to it and frequently shrivel and fall off even if the plants are covered with a row cover to protect them. Therefore, you should try to plant your second crop so that flowering and fruiting occurs well before frost is expected for your area. If done right, they will flower and fruit for at least 2-3 weeks.


Posted by: Kerry Mauck (58 points) Kerry Mauck
Posted: June 20, 2013


Conni Schaftenaar commented,
Here in Michigan, we generally can't plant things in the garden until mid-May. Some years (this one for instance) it is still fairly cool, but some years not. I like the idea of starting some indoors earlier so that they are fairly well started by mid-May to take advantage of the earlier/cooler weather. Thanks for the tip!
over 7 years ago.



2
points
Adding inoculant may be another piece of the puzzle, to make sure you have the correct rhizobacteria in your soil. Some legume seed comes pretreated; that may have been the case with your first crop.

For instance, see
http://www.groworganic.com/seeds/cove...


Posted by: Tanya in the Garden (128 points) Tanya in the Garden
Posted: June 20, 2013


Conni Schaftenaar commented,
Thanks, Tanya!

over 7 years ago.



1
point
These peas can be planted very early (February-May in most places) and really require cool temperatures. You also need a substantial amount of organic matter in the soil and they also require well drained soil and full sun. Germination should take 14 days (maximum) and should happen no matter the soil make-out. If you didn't get good germination, even with the proper temperatures, then you may want to try a different company's seeds. If you want to try again I'd wait for the summer to pass and plant some more seeds later on for the Fall harvest when it cools down.


Posted by: Kathryn Fiedler (72 points) Kathryn Fiedler
Posted: June 20, 2013


Conni Schaftenaar commented,
Thanks - I will take a page from Kerry's book (another responder) and try starting some indoors earlier so that by the time we don't have to worry about frost (we had frost here at the end of May this year), they are pretty well going. I will also incorporate more organic matter! The irony is that the year we had the huge area of peas in this same garden plot, it was full summer, and hot, and they were pouring out huge, delicious pea pods. Not sure where those seeds came from, as it was many years ago. I believe we would get frost too early to try a fall crop, but I will look at the growing time and see if that might work. Thanks again!
over 7 years ago.



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