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Stunted, pale curling leaves on new growth

Tomato    Australia

Roma tomatoes planted in a new bed. Mulched with straw and drip watered. previously healthy, now new growth paler, stunted, curling. Is this a fungal or bacterial problem or something else? Can I treat or do I need to remove the 2 plants currently affected from my crop.


Posted by: Julie Thompson (1 point) Julie Thompson
Posted: November 28, 2014




Answers

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It looks like it is Beet Curly Top Virus (BCTV). Are the leaves thick and crisp, rolling upwards? And do the petioles face downwards. If so, it is vectored by insects. I have not found records for BCTV in Australia. Other viruses also cause stunting. They are also vectored by insects

Send additional pictures. But remove the plants either way.

I dont think it is bacterial or fungal, but again more images can help



Posted by: David Hughes (54 points) David Hughes
Posted: December 1, 2014




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If it turns necrotic it could be calcium deficiency. It could also be herbicide damage from drift.


Posted by: Jeremy Pickens (1 point) Jeremy Pickens
Posted: December 13, 2014




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If it's only affecting new growth, it might well be a virus. Instead of BCTV, it might be a different Geminivirus, TYLCV, tomato yellow leaf curl virus, which has been found in Australia, specifically the Queensland area about a decade ago. The severe stunting, chlorosis, leaf curl and bumpiness are all symptoms. Do you have whiteflies? TYLCV is spread by whiteflies.


Posted by: Randi Jimenez (1 point) Randi Jimenez
Posted: June 17, 2015




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