2
points
What plants would be easiest to grow and keep in pots?

General    Pennsylvania, USA

Moving into a new home with a little patio I decided I would really like to try and grow my own veggies, fruit and herbs. I will mainly have to keep my plants in pots though. What plants would you recommend to a newby without green fingers?


Posted by: Charissa (3 points) Charissa
Posted: February 22, 2013




Answers

5
points
Leafy "cut-and-come-again" crops that you can plant in solid blocks make good choices for small-space gardens. Suggestions: Swiss chard, any variety of kale, mesclun mixes (lettuce, Asian greens of various types),arugula and spinach. Just harvest the outer leaves as you need them, and the plants will keep on growing and giving.

A large container (think recycled polypropylene shopping bags or sandbags) could hold a couple of broccoli plants. Many varieties will produce side shoots for two or three months after you've harvested the main head.


Posted by: Peg Boyles (3 points) Peg Boyles
Posted: February 23, 2013


deactivated commented,
+1 for images - nice!!
over 6 years ago.

David Hughes commented,
+1 from me too for such a lovely compilation of images. Great stuff Peg.
over 6 years ago.

Lindsay McMenemy commented,
+1 from me too! The information provided in the answers to this post as a whole is just fantastic!
over 6 years ago.

Charissa commented,
Thanks very much for your illustrated answer Peg. Can't wait for winter to be over to get a chance to give this a go. I'll post some pics of the progress once I get going.
over 6 years ago.



3
points
Lettuce and strawberries are very easy. Citrus and blueberries will also handle pot culture pretty well. Chives, oregano, mint, rosemary and basil tend to do pretty decently too.

I currently keep a variety of tropical plants in pots, including such novelties as coffee and starfruit.

The two biggest problems with pots are overwatering and underwatering. Unless you're really good at keeping your eyes open, you may want some mechanisms in place to keep you from inadvertently killing things. If you set up with some kind of wicking pots from the beginning, you're likely to save yourself some frustration. This fellow has a novel approach:

http://www.urbanorganicgardener.com/2...

Good for you for jumping into gardening even without "green fingers." You'll get there.


Posted by: David Goodman (67 points) David Goodman
Posted: February 22, 2013


David Hughes commented,
You have coffee in a plant pot. How very cool: a coffee pot (did you get beans, how tall has it grown)
over 6 years ago.

Lindsay McMenemy commented,
Coffee - another plant that will be added to the plant list in due course.... the 'C' list is going to be massive!!! Oh and well done on making the 10 point milestone David G!
over 6 years ago.

Charissa commented,
Thanks very much for your answer David. Very helpful! As soon as I have settled into my new home I will follow up your advice and see if I can make some wicking pots myself. Another thing I am wondering is if it would be wisest to start from seeds or try to find some small plants to start out with?
over 6 years ago.

David Goodman commented,
Direct seeding is the least expensive and healthiest method for most plants. It's a win-win. Since you're starting in pots already, I'd go for seeds except on things that are hard to do that way. Basil, cilantro, parsley, lettuce, etc. are easy. Rosemary, oregano and larger perennial fruits and herbs - though fun to start from seeds - are not as easy. But push yourself anyhow. I've sometimes had great luck with things I didn't expect would do well.
over 6 years ago.

David Goodman commented,
My coffee plant is about 30" tall, I'd say. It's about to bloom for the first time - if I get fruits this year, I'll save the seeds and start more. It's a totally lovely plant that apparently adapts well to indoor culture as well.
over 6 years ago.

Charissa commented,
Great! I will start from seeds. As soon as there is some progress in all this I will make sure to post some pics! Again thanks very much!
over 6 years ago.



1
point
Just wanted to give the link to David's earlier answer on a different post about shaded areas in the garden
If you have a small space then this is certainly something to consider: vertical gardening
https://www.plantvillage.com/posts/139


Posted by: Lindsay McMenemy (2 points) Lindsay McMenemy
Posted: February 22, 2013


Charissa commented,
Thanks! That's a great idea as well
over 6 years ago.



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